heavyrain

STORM UPDATE: Worst rain to hit about 9 p.m., taper off dramatically by 6 a.m. Tuesday; police patrols watching for landslides and damage throughout night

Read Time:1 Minute, 39 Second

Update (10 p.m. Monday): The maximum rainfall rate now forecast by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute between now and 6 a.m. Tuesday is 1.4 mm per hour. That’s half the rate that triggered the landslides in mid-October and – in theory – not high enough to trigger slides on its own, according to an expert at The University Centre in Svalbard. But don’t breath easy, given how saturated the mountains already were before the storm, the immense soaking they’ve already gotten today and the continuing near-gale winds.

Original story: A revised forecast by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute is calling for about 10 more millimeters of preciptation in Longyearbyen between 8 p.m. Monday and 6 a.m. Tuesday, with the heaviest rain between 9 p.m. and midnight. Wind gusts up to 60 kilometers per hour are also expected.

Two police officers working for The Governor of Svalbard will monitor the mountainsides and other at-risk areas throughout Monday night and Tuesday morning using patrol vehicles, said Police Chief Lt. Arve Johnsen.The forecast updated at about 5 p.m. Monday calls for up to 5.7 millimeters of precipitation between 8 a.m. and midnight Monday, and up to 4.1 millimeters between midnight and 6 a.m. Tuesday. Rain will taper off to a drizzle most of the day Tuesday, but up to five millimeters more is forecast between 6 p.m. Tuesday and 6 a.m. Wednesday.

About 140 people were forced to evacuate their residences early Monday afternoon due to landslide threats posed by the storm. Some of the areas along the town’s eastern mountains, including Nybyen and homes between Vei 222 and 228, were also evacuated following a massive avalanche last Dec. 19. But during this storm settled areas along the western mountains were also evacuated since the worst landslide during a major storm in mid-October fell from that mountainside.

Officials expect residents to be able to return to their homes on Tuesday.

About Post Author

Mark Sabbatini

I'm a professional transient living on a tiny Norwegian island next door to the North Pole, where once a week (or thereabouts) I pollute our extreme and pristine environment with paper fishwrappers decorated with seemingly random letters that would cause a thousand monkeys with a thousand typewriters to die of humiliation. Such is the wisdom one acquires after more than 25 years in the world's second-least-respected occupation, much of it roaming the seven continents in search of jazz, unrecognizable street food and escorts I f****d with by insisting they give me the platonic tours of their cities promised in their ads. But it turns out this tiny group of islands known as Svalbard is my True Love and, generous contributions from you willing, I'll keep littering until they dig my body out when my climate-change-deformed apartment collapses or they exile my penniless ass because I'm not even worthy of washing your dirty dishes.
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%
nybyenclosed Previous post STORM UPDATE: Avalanche danger at maximum possible level above 700 meters; cable car installations unstable
nybyenclosed Next post STORM UPDATE: Evacuation situation remains uncertain with more rain and warm temperatures expected tonight