Tag Archives: Utøya

10 YEARS AFTER UTØYA: Five Longyearbyen youths were at the youth camp where 69 people were killed July 22, 2011 – here’s how it affected what they and/or their families are doing now

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Photo of Longyearbyen’s 10-year anniversary memorial of July 22 attacks by Eira Egner / Svalbardposten.

Einar Buø says “we have seen surprisingly little anger and cursing” during the 10 years since his son, Johannes, 14, was among the youngest of the 69 people killed during the July 22 attack by a lone gunman at Utøya. But he wonders if that’s an entirely good thing.

Buø, while like other survivors affected by that day emphasizes focusing on the present and future, also shares with them a “never forgot” mentality and like many is seeking to counter the hateful mentality triggering Norway’s deadliest terrorist attack that killed at total of 77 people when the shooting followed a bombing by the same man in Oslo.

‘A BETTER, MORE INCLUSIVE AND MORE TOLERANT FUTURE’: An interview with Viljar Hanssen 10 years after surviving Utøya

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Viljar Hanssen, 27, was a high school student in Longyearbyen when he became one of the most recognizable survivors of the July 22, 2011, massacre at Utøya. He suffered near-fatal injuries after being shot five times, ultimately losing an eye and suffering severe impairment of his motor functions.

Nine years after July 22 attacks, local victims and families say new turmoil is why ‘utmost consequence of totalitarian and hateful thought can’t be remembered too often these days’

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Nine years after nearly being killed – but losing an eye and suffering other long-term injuries – in Norway’s deadliest terrorist attack at Oslo and Utøya, Viljar Hanssen didn’t have much to say – at least about that fateful July 22 date.

8 YEARS AFTER UTØYA: Anniversary of July 22 massacre sees two Longyearbyen families seeking inclusiveness, rejecting fear

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The physical and mental scars may get more distant every year, but for two Longyearbyen families victimized by Norway’s deadliest terrorist attack the pleas to “never forget” continue to grow as they see the fear and hatred that traumatized their lives expanding in a global community struggling due to suffering and change.

‘We must open our eyes:’ Five years after Utøya killings, local survivor disappointed some treating it as ‘a natural disaster’

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It was the attack the country could never forget, yet it seems people have – or at least the lessons they should have learned.

The fifth anniversary of the mass killing spree by Anders Behring Breivik comes in the midst of a wave of terrorist attacks, mass shootings and other international upheavals that has some Norwegians wondering when they’ll become part of the turmoil. That upsets Viljar Hanssen, who was a 17-year-old Longyearbyen student when he was nearly killed after being shot five times by Breivik at the Utøya youth camp where 69 people died.

Unable to forget: Local survivors of Utøya moving to new places, but old scars remain on fourth anniversary of tragedy

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Viljar Hanssen just moved into his own “man cave.” His brother, Torje, celebrated his 18th birthday last week. But as they enter new landmark stages of their lives, they’re being forced to admit to themselves they’ll never be able to leave behind the physical and mental scars inflicted on them four years ago today.