Tag Archives: Svalbard Global Seed Vault

Seedy story: Review: ‘Seeds on Ice’ gets global raves – but does it reveal the ‘Doomsday Vault’s’ true secrets?

caryseeds

Nobody’s ever peed inside the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which is a bit surprising given all the media/VIP tours and the fact there’s a chemical toilet in there. Then again, it’s not like a lot of normal human functions are happening in what staffers adamantly refuse to call the Doomsday Vault.

Random weirdness for the week of Aug. 30

boobtube

Since we’re all about “Svalbard on screen” this week (stupid editor and his insatiable ego…grumble, grumble), the trolls writing this under duress while locked in a dungeon are highlighting the new reality series about this place that’s really revealing.

Into blackness: Svalbard’s 12 biggest stories of 2015

topstories15

It was already a shell-shocked community beginning to say their farewells to possibly a quarter of the town’s residents, with those left behind worrying about the future of a town with a decimated economic foundation.

Then the avalanche struck.

Either alone ranks among the most significant events in Longyearbyen’s history. Together they may reshape the town more dramatically than at any time since it was almost entirely destroyed during World War II.

Briefs from Svalbardposten for the week of Oct. 27, 2015

unisguvleaving

UNIS director stepping down during critical transition   
Ole Arve Misund is stepping down as the director of The University Centre in Svalbard to become director of the National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research) as of Feb. 1.

Random weirdness for the week of Oct. 6, 2015

hamlet

If you think the guy is the picture is demanding your wallet, you’re sort of correct (and no we didn’t just pick some black guy with a gun…in fact, the real reason he’s carrying it might be more disturbing than a stick-up).

Host apocalyptic: Syria makes first withdrawal from Svalbard seed vault as war damages facility with key crops

euguyinvault

Its creators hate the term “Doomsday Vault,” but for Syria that day has arrived.

A historic first “withdrawal” from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault on behalf of Syria occurred during a visit Sunday by Norwegian and European Union leaders. A seed bank in the city of Aleppo is still partially operational despite the civil war that has heavily damaged the city, but can no longer function as a hub for providing seeds to other countries in the region.

Seeds of recovery: Syria may make first ‘withdrawal’ from Svalbard vault as crops, seed sites devastated by war

carysyria

In one small part of the world, doomsday has arrived.

The first “withdrawal” from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault will likely be made by Syria, which has been engaged in a civil war since 2011. The country’s crops and a major gene research facility have been targeted by rebels, and the hope is to return the seeds to the facility after it is relocated.

Random weirdness for the week of July 15, 2015

dinodisplay

One of Svalbard’s famous creatures is coming out of the closet and exhibiting its vibrant hues after six years in the latest release of the horror/drama/comedy series “Sea Monsters of the North.”

Random weirdness for the week of July 7, 2015

bearvideo

Svalbard’s toughest polar bear is playing the lead role in a new “Amazing Places” video titled “The Islands Where Guns are Required.” The video, part of a series by producer Tom Scott, is fueling a lively debate among gun fans and opponents, including questions about what kind of firepower would be needed to take out the star of the show (tripwire explosives end up being part of the debate, thanks to a massive overestimation of their potency).

Growing pains: Seed vault’s status as savior or saboteur gets new media, movie scrutiny

seedsoftime

The good: A “daring rescue” of seeds in worn-torn Syria that may ensure the country’s future food production. The bad: a rusted refrigerator part at the seeds’ new home in Svalbard that “for a few horrible moments (suggested) the future of human civilization was in jeopardy.” The mixed: the drama of our possible “mass extinction” of meals is getting big-screen exposure, but critics aren’t finding it all that palatable.