Tag Archives: Bjørnøya

Border petrol: New drilling areas within 30km of Bjørnøya has oil companies, environmentalists feeling highly energetic

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Norway’s newest oil drilling areas are almost literally as close to Svalbard as possible, creating the archipelago’s version of a border debate. Those approaching are harboring dreams of the richest economic opportunity in the region, while defenders of the homeland are enraged about the drastic problems that might result from mass migration.

Nine new drilling licenses for 47 blocks in the Barents Sea were unveiled by the Norwegian government Monday, with the closest block about 30 kilometers to the east and just barely south of Bjørnøya. A total of six blocks extend the 74 degrees latitude north – the same as Bjørnøya – and another 27 are at or beyond 73 degrees.

Briefs from Svalbardposten for the week of May 22, 2018

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Polar bear spotted near Longyearbyen wanders off, but officials keeping watch
A polar bear spotted near Longyearbyen late Tuesday night wandered away from town a few hours later, but officials are continuing to monitor the area in case the animal returns, police said Wednesday.

In-the-red storm rising: Meteorological institute may eliminate staff at Hopen station, majority at Bjørnøya due to deficits

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Eliminating five of the nine employees at the Bjørnøya Meteorological Station and automating operations at the Hopen station where four people now work is being considered by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute to help cope with a long-term deficit, according to the agency’s director.

Dead men do tell tales: Archaeologists ‘solve’ mysterious death on Bjørnøya with elementary clues, Sherlock

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It could be the ideal setting for CSI Svalbard, except these deadly mysteries are taking considerable longer than 60 minutes to solve.

‘Murder and Mystery on Bjørnøya:’ Mass grave is real-life bone chiller for team trying to save exposed ruins

A common tale is the grave contains the bodies of those killed when a trawler sank in 1938. Except the cross and a chain surrounding are visible in a picture taken in 1924. Not to mention there are nearby graves and ruins dating back to the 1700s.

And bones – lots of bones – of both humans and walruses.