TWICE AS ICE: Since Svalbard is warming 7X faster than the global average, scientists studying long-term patterns say – big shock – glacier melt rate speeding up and may double by 2100

TWICE AS ICE: Since Svalbard is warming 7X faster than the global average, scientists studying long-term patterns say – big shock – glacier melt rate speeding up and may double by 2100

Yeah, it’s yet another climate study predicting a hellishly gloomy Svalbard by 2100. But instead of triggering heartburn by focusing on impacts such as dead polar bears this study warning about the More »

13 COVID CASES IN SVALBARD FIRST WEEK OF 2022: Four infected with Omicron, officials said they’ve lost control of ability to track cases, increases expected to continue

13 COVID CASES IN SVALBARD FIRST WEEK OF 2022: Four infected with Omicron, officials said they’ve lost control of ability to track cases, increases expected to continue

Photo by Longyearbyen Lokalstyre A total of 13 COVID-19 cases were detected among residents and visitors in Svalbard during the first week of 2022, including four of the Omicron variant, with local More »

ONE OF SVALBARD’S TWO UNDERSEA FIBER CABLES SEVERED: Officials say communications capability still normal, emergency repair and contingency operations underway

ONE OF SVALBARD’S TWO UNDERSEA FIBER CABLES SEVERED: Officials say communications capability still normal, emergency repair and contingency operations underway

One of two subsea fiber cables providing communications capabilities to Svalbard from mainland Norway is severed, posing a potential threat to virtually cut off the archipelago from the outside world although capabilities More »

SWISS APPOINT SVALBARD’S FIRST ‘HONORARY’ CONSUL: Marcel Schütz, a tour operator critical of Norway’s recent policy for foreigners, named first-ever such diplomat in Arctic

SWISS APPOINT SVALBARD’S FIRST ‘HONORARY’ CONSUL: Marcel Schütz, a tour operator critical of Norway’s recent policy for foreigners, named first-ever such diplomat in Arctic

Photo Marcel Schütz, right, discussing his new appointment as Switzerland’s first honorary consul in Svalbard, by Michael Wenger Marcel Schütz is among those recently questioning the Norwegian government’s approach to policy regarding More »

SOLIDIFYING THE LAND, STIRRING UP THE WATERS: Expert says Russia will boost peaceful activities in Svalbard such as tourism and research, increase military provocation at sea

SOLIDIFYING THE LAND, STIRRING UP THE WATERS: Expert says Russia will boost peaceful activities in Svalbard such as tourism and research, increase military provocation at sea

Photo of Lenin bust in Barentsburg by Wikimedia Commons “Russia isn’t about to annex Svalbard,” but is planning a hostile takeover of sorts in the waters surrounding it, according to a polar More »

 

SEAL OF DISAPPROVAL: Man fined 20,000 kroner, but avoids prison, for ‘incorrect’ explanation to police about shooting of a seal by another person at Svea

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Photo courtesy of The Research Council of Norway

A man in his mid-20s has been sentenced to 14 days probation and fined 20,000 kroner for an “incorrect explanation to the police in connection with the illegal hunting of a bearded seal in Svea in June this year,” The Governor of Svalbard announced Friday.

WALLOPING WIND ON WEDNESDAY: Hurricane-force winds of 126 km/h, blowing snow in Longyearbyen prompt warning to secure objects, avoid travel in exposed areas

A blizzard with hurricane-force winds up to 126 kilometers an hour is expected to hit Longyearbyen and Nordenskiöld Land on Wednesday, with officials urging residents to secure loose objects, avoid unnecessay travel in exposed areas and exercise extreme caution if navigating at sea.

CHILLY CLIMATE CONFERENCE CONCLUSION: An amazingly astute 700-word analysis of the UN’s COP 26 agreement, courtesy of our alt-weekly brethren in Boston

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COP 26 fire collage by Jason Pramas. All images used are in the public domain

The following “wish this was satire” analysis is an Association of Alternative Media contribution by DigBoston Executive Editor Jason Pramas (original link):

LONGYEARBYEN TO SHUT COAL POWER PLANT IN 2023: Council unanimously OKs plan to temporarily switch to diesel, implement all-renewable energy supply by 2030

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Wow, that happened fast.

Shutting down Longyearbyen’s coal power plant in 2023 was unanimously approved at the most recent meeting of the municipal council, drastically accelerating a timeline that just a few years ago envisioned operating the plant for much of its remaining lifespan (possibly into the next decade). That shrunk last year to a gradual phaseout within five years and local leaders hastened plans again in February with the proposal to shut the plant in two years.

The council approved switching to diesel temporarily when the coal plant closes, and implementing an all-renewable energy supply by 2030 – a plan many residents are questioning the economic, logistical and environmental wisdom of.

TAKING UP TORCHES FOR TOURISM: Locals upset about proposed environmental access restrictions planning fiery greeting for officials hosting Q&A on Tuesday

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Folks fired up about proposed changes to Svalbard’s environmental regulations are planning to greet visiting agency officials with a torchlight protest that will end outside a public Q&A meeting about the changes scheduled Tuesday evening at Kulturhuset.

RUSSIA ACCUSES NORWAY OF ‘HIDDEN MILITARIZATION’ OF SVALBARD: Recent visit by Navy ship to archipelago part of provocative ongoing military development, ministry alleges

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Photo of the KNM Thor Heyerdahl docked in Longyearbyen in late October by the Norwegian Navy

Norwegian military ships visiting Svalbard are a regular, if not frequent, occurrence and legal as long as it’s for “non-war” purposes. But Russia is calling a voyage by a Navy vessel in October part of Norway’s ongoing efforts to develop military infrastructure in the archipelago in violation of the Svalbard Treaty’s intent.

Norway maintains the voyage is just business as usual – and Russia has faced plenty of accusations of illegal and/or provocative military activities in Svalbard and elsewhere in the Arctic.

MULTIPLE COVID-19 CASES IN LONGYEARBYEN PROMPT EMERGENCY MEETING: Several measures including free self-tests implemented, but ‘no need to impose strict measures’

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Multiple cases of COVID-19 in Longyearbyen among residents and visitors prompted a meeting of the local emergency council Thursday and the implementation of several measures, but officials said there is no need yet to impose strict infection-control measures.

RUSSIA NOW ALSO SEEKS TO CURB COAL CO2: Plan for reconstruction of Barentsburg power plant to reduce emissions comes as Longyearbyen votes to shut its plant by 2023

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Barentsburg isn’t joining Longyearbyen’s just-announced decision to shutting down its coal power plant by 2023, but a reconstruction of the plant in the Russian settlement to reduce emissions in part of a new five-year plan in Svalbard, according to Russia’s government.

The plan also seeks a reduction in coal mining activities – notable because Russia has openly stated it plans to continue operations as long as practically feasible as part of its effort to maintain a strong presence in the archipelago as part of its broader quest for Arctic influence.

TOURISM AGENCIES PROTEST ‘INVASIVE REGULATION PROPOSALS’: Svalbard business leaders ask government to nix ‘rushed’ changes tightening access and increasing mandates

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Tourism and business leaders are asking Norway’s government to withdraw “invasive regulation proposals”  imposing stricter environmental restrictions in Svalbard, arguing they are the result of a rushed and flawed process that will result in serious adverse consequences for local residents.

LESS IS MORE IS LESS FOR FINAL SVEA SHUTDOWN CONTRACT: Early estimate of 684M kr. to dismantle mines ballooned to 2.5B kr., but now ‘only’ 1.7B kr. for cleanup expected by 2023

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Depending on the spin, the final dismantling of the Svea and Lunckefjell mining communities will 1) cost 1 billion kroner more or 800 million kroner less than projected and 2) be completed three years later or two years earlier than expected.