Growing pains: Seed vault’s status as savior or saboteur gets new media, movie scrutiny

Growing pains: Seed vault’s status as savior or saboteur gets new media, movie scrutiny

The good: A “daring rescue” of seeds in worn-torn Syria that may ensure the country’s future food production. The bad: a rusted refrigerator part at the seeds’ new home in Svalbard that More »

Norovirus outbreak hits following Syttende Mai celebration Longyearbyen

Norovirus outbreak hits following Syttende Mai celebration Longyearbyen

About 20 people were treated for norovirus infections during the days immediately after this year’s Syttende Mai celebration, according to Longyearbyen health officials who said the origin of the outbreak is unknown. More »

Higher coal prices in 2016? Don’t bet on it

Higher coal prices in 2016? Don’t bet on it

Store Norske and the Norwegian government are betting heavily on coal prices rising next year, but don’t expect your broker to advise doing the same. Coal prices might recover from a worldwide More »

Random weirdness for the week of May 20, 2015

Random weirdness for the week of May 20, 2015

A seeming epidemic of tourists taking the piss is causing locals to…well, do some taking the piss themselves. “This guy stopped right outside the window while we ate breakfast last summer,” wrote More »

Progress Party leader: Send these refugees to Svalbard

Progress Party leader: Send these refugees to Svalbard

Svalbard is already a haven for Syria’s crops that are under threat in the war-torn country. Now it’s being suggested thousands of refugees fleeing the country be sent to the archipelago as More »

 

Growing pains: Seed vault’s status as savior or saboteur gets new media, movie scrutiny

seedsoftime

The good: A “daring rescue” of seeds in worn-torn Syria that may ensure the country’s future food production. The bad: a rusted refrigerator part at the seeds’ new home in Svalbard that “for a few horrible moments (suggested) the future of human civilization was in jeopardy.” The mixed: the drama of our possible “mass extinction” of meals is getting big-screen exposure, but critics aren’t finding it all that palatable.

Norovirus outbreak hits following Syttende Mai celebration Longyearbyen

hospitalnorovirus

About 20 people were treated for norovirus infections during the days immediately after this year’s Syttende Mai celebration, according to Longyearbyen health officials who said the origin of the outbreak is unknown.

Higher coal prices in 2016? Don’t bet on it

coalpricespic

Store Norske and the Norwegian government are betting heavily on coal prices rising next year, but don’t expect your broker to advise doing the same.

Coal prices might recover from a worldwide slump, but there’s sharp disagreement about whether it may take one year or many for that to start happening. Numerous reasons for a lengthy low-price trend are cited, including cheap alternative energy sources such as natural gas, increasing production from suppliers in other parts of the world and many countries – including Norway, except for its stance regarding Svalbard – shunning coal because of its environmental impacts.

Random weirdness for the week of May 20, 2015

anotherpeetourist

A seeming epidemic of tourists taking the piss is causing locals to…well, do some taking the piss themselves. “This guy stopped right outside the window while we ate breakfast last summer,” wrote Norma Setså, who posted a photo from her iPhone a local Facebook discussion page. That incident, coming after two other recent yellow alerts, has resulted in a free-flowing discussion and exhibition of visitors exhibiting themselves

Progress Party leader: Send these refugees to Svalbard

syriansvalbard

Svalbard is already a haven for Syria’s crops that are under threat in the war-torn country. Now it’s being suggested thousands of refugees fleeing the country be sent to the archipelago as well.

The ultimate in iceberg lettuce: Sustainable living company building Longyearbyen’s first outdoor greenhouse

ppgreenhouse

In the unfortunate event locals feel the need to raid seeds from the Doomsday Vault, at least now there’s someplace to plant them.

In the meantime, a group of green thumbs are hoping to sprout some “locally sourced” cuisine with the help of traditionally discarded materials such used cooking oil, dog poop and beer sludge.

Editorial: Norway’s Russian-like tyranny threatens to crush one of Svalbard’s best news sources

barentsweb

Remember the furor about the Russian deputy PM’s visit (you should since we and lots of other media are still fixated on it)? BarentsObserver made it happen by breaking the story – and now government officials in Norway are stripping the publication of its right to publish without censorship.

Ulrik Snibsøer wins annual youth cultural award as a master of all musical trades, knows-jack of none

ulrikaward

For Ulrik Snibsøer, the magic word was “ukelele.”

Snibsøer, 15, who picked up a saxophone at age five and a wide assortment of other instruments since, realized he was the winner of this year’s 10,000-kroner youth cultural grant when the recitation of a lengthy list of the person’s musical credentials reached an instrument he picked up recently that some teens might shun as lacking a certain cool factor.

Nothing fishy about it: Lasse Stener Hanssen scores Tyfus Statuette with medley of music festivals and moving locals

lassetyfus

Leave out the lutefisk and there’s no disputing Lasse Stener Hanssen has brought a great deal of harmony to Svalbard.

During his 15 years here he’s composed a societal score featuring jolts of jazz, medleys from miners, sightseeing on ships, and getting people and their stuff moved around more efficiently. While all that is what he refers to as merely just doing his job, it earned him Longyearbyen’s top citizen award as he was presented with the Tyfus Statuette during the Syttende Mai gala Sunday at Kulturhuset.

Nothing to see here: 10,000-year-old ice shelf likely to vanish in a few years; climate skeptics shrug

larsoniceshelf

Since they’re trying to stop rising sea levels by prohibiting people from talking about why it’s happening, it’s not like the addition of yet another massive soon-to-be-melted chunk of ice is going to be of concern.

This time the skeptics are dissing a team of researchers, including one from The University Centre in Svalbard, who have determined the 10,000-year-old Larsen B Ice Shelf is likely to completely collapse by 2020.